Infographic: How to spot sugar on an ingredients list

It’s not always easy to spot sugar on ingredients lists, because it can come under lots of different names. To help you avoid eating too much added sugar, our infographic shows 50 names for sugar you might come across.

The Sweet Spot : Dialing Back Sugar and Amping Up Flavor: A Cookbook

How To Spot Sugar On Food Labels

By Mark Briggs (The Ecologist)

 

Sugar Consumption Stats


  • The average American consumes at least 64 pounds of sugar per year, and the average teenage boy at least 109 pounds.
  • Per capita consumption of added sugars has risen by 28 percent since 1983.
  • Americans consume 22 teaspoons of added sugars a day, teens 34 teaspoons.

Why Worry About Sugar?


Sugar is often a hidden ingredient in processed foods. Among other things, it enhances flavor, promotes browning and aids in preservation; however, the high sugar content in foods comes with a trade off. Excessive sugar intake can lead to type 2 diabetes, contribute to metabolic syndrome and lead to excessive weight gain. The empty calories in sugar don’t provide any nutritional benefit to the body, which is why it is important to know other names for sugar on food labels.

As noted by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), people who consume diets high in added sugars consume lower levels of fiber, vitamins and minerals, and other nutrients, and by displacing these protective nutrients, added sugars may increase the risk of osteoporosis, certain cancers, high blood pressure and other health problems.
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